Tuesday, September 11, 2018

Website Nevada Post 76



We are still having a problem with our website Webs  Support tells me that when they get it fixed the will email me and let me know when. by email, to nvpost76@gmail.com the problem is with there new programming. And they are working on it

Sunday, September 9, 2018

Saturday, August 25, 2018

Statement by Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Joseph F. Dunford, Jr. on the Passing of Senator John McCain

 

08/25/2018 08:42 PM CDT


IMMEDIATE RELEASE
No. NR-248-18
Aug. 25, 2018


Statement by Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Joseph F. Dunford, Jr. on the Passing of Senator John McCain

Statement by Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Joseph F. Dunford, Jr.:
"Senator McCain exemplified what it means to be a warrior and dedicated public servant. Both as a naval officer and as a member of Congress, he was a lifelong and tireless advocate for the men and women of the U.S. military.


"He traveled the world to meet personally with Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines and Coast Guardsmen, to hear what they had to say, and to see firsthand our military in action on the front lines. Senator McCain recognized the sacrifice and hardships military members and their families can experience and proudly served as their champion in Congress. He visited our nation's wounded warriors around the country to offer encouragement and to thank them for their service. Through his tenacious and selfless leadership in the Senate, he fought hard to ensure our Armed Forces remained strong and had the support and resources needed to succeed when placed in harm's way.


"While we mourn Senator McCain's passing, we are eternally grateful for his distinguished service to our nation, his advocacy of the U.S. military, and the incredible example he set for us all."

Monday, August 20, 2018

STAND UP FOR BILL (And Other Veterans and Their Families)


STAND UP FOR BILL
(And Other Veterans and Their Families)

I would like to create state and federal legislation that does the following:

1.  Directs the Veterans Administration (VA) and the Nevada Department of Veterans Services to create free, accredited continuing professional education (CPE) for civilian health care workers and paramedical case workers (including social workers and chaplains) on veterans health issues. 

2.  Directs all health care providers to change their intake forms and health questionnaires to ask if patients “had any US military service” in order to “begin the conversation”.   Self identified veterans should be asked to fill out an additional military questionnaire.  A proposed format is available.

3.  Directs the Department of Veterans Affairs to require that all health care workers (including VA health care workers and CHOICE doctors) be familiar with compensable diseases and disabilities so they can refer Vets and their families to the VA benefits office for evaluation and additional assistance. 

4.  Directs the VA and the Nevada Department of Veterans Services to use public service announcements and other media to reach out to veterans and their families to inform them about presumed connected disabilities and report back to the Secretary of Veterans Affairs, the Nevada state governor and the veterans legislative committee annually on the effectiveness of these techniques.  

5.  Directs the VA and the Nevada Department of Veterans Services to prominently display flyers and other media on presumed connected disabilities to all offices that work with veterans and their families, including VA cemeteries.

6.  Directs the VA and the Nevada Department of Veterans Services to prominently display flyers and other media about survivor benefits to all offices that work with veterans and their families, including VA cemeteries.

7.  Directs the VA and the Nevada Department of Veterans Services to contact civilian support groups that routinely work with people who have one of the presumed connected disabilities (e.g. the American Heart Association, the American Lung Association or the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society) and work with them to identify veterans, children and grandchildren who have a disease presumed connected to military service. Identified veterans and family members should be referred to designated VA resources.  Records of these referrals should be rolled up to the governor, state legislative affairs committee and the Secretary of  Veterans Affairs on a yearly basis. 

8.  Directs each state to keep records and prepare a yearly report to the governor, the veterans legislative committee and the Secretary of Veterans Affairs evaluating the effectiveness of the training delivered, contacts made and media used to provide information to veterans, spouses and health care professionals.

WE MUST ACT NOW
   We must make sure that Vietnam Veterans who have a presumed connected disease take full advantage of the benefits that they earned by their service to our country.
   We must make sure that Vietnam Veteran survivors have access to the benefits that their loved one earned by their service to our country.
   We must make sure that veterans from other conflicts such as the Korean War, the Gulf War, Iraq War, the war in Afghanistan, certain defense department projects and Camp Lejeune know about the diseases and disabilities presumed connected to their military service.
    We must act now to protect the children and grandchildren of veterans who were exposed to toxic substances during their military service.

The VA has recognized certain cancers and other health problems as presumptive diseases associated with exposure to Agent Orange or other herbicides during military service. Veterans and their survivors may be eligible for benefits for these diseases.

          AL Amyloidosis
          A rare disease caused when an abnormal protein, amyloid, enters tissues or organs
          Chronic B-cell Leukemias
          A type of cancer which affects white blood cells
          Chloracne (or similar acneform disease)
          A skin condition that occurs soon after exposure to chemicals and looks like common forms of acne seen in teenagers. Under VA's rating regulations, it must be at least 10 percent disabling within one year of exposure to herbicides.
          Diabetes Mellitus Type 2
          A disease characterized by high blood sugar levels resulting from the body’s inability to respond properly to the hormone insulin
          Hodgkin's Disease
          A malignant lymphoma (cancer) characterized by progressive enlargement of the lymph nodes, liver, and spleen, and by progressive anemia
          Ischemic Heart Disease
          A disease characterized by a reduced supply of blood to the heart, that leads to chest pain also called coronary artery disease
          Multiple Myeloma
          A cancer of plasma cells, a type of white blood cell in bone marrow
          Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
          A group of cancers that affect the lymph glands and other lymphatic tissue
          Parkinson's Disease
          A progressive disorder of the nervous system that affects muscle movement
          Peripheral Neuropathy, Early-Onset
          A nervous system condition that causes numbness, tingling, and motor weakness. Under VA's rating regulations, it must be at least 10 percent disabling within one year of herbicide exposure
          Porphyria Cutanea Tarda
          A disorder characterized by liver dysfunction and by thinning and blistering of the skin in sun-exposed areas. Under VA's rating regulations, it must be at least 10 percent disabling within one year of exposure to herbicides
          Prostate Cancer
          Cancer of the prostate; one of the most common cancers among men
          Respiratory Cancers  (includes lung cancer)
            and cancers of the lung, larynx, trachea, and bronchus
          Soft Tissue Sarcomas (other than osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, Kaposi's sarcoma, or mesothelioma) A group of different types of cancers in body tissues such as muscle, fat, blood and lymph vessels, and connective tissues
          Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis aka Lou Gehrig’s disease causes the death of neuron controlling voluntary muscles.  This disease is associated with service in Vietnam.

If you would like to help me in this effort, or if you have ideas  on how to spread the word about presumed connected disabilities, please feel free to contact me.  I am Barbara Rodgick and I am the widow of an Agent Orange Vet.  My phone number is 425-442-7563 and my email address is barbara98065@gmail.com.  8/18/18
    

Saturday, June 30, 2018

No Unaccompanied Veteran Interments for 7-5-18


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No Unaccompanied Veteran Interments for 7-5-18

Hi Everyone,

There are currently no unaccompanied veteran interments scheduled for Thursday, July 5th because of the 4th of July holiday.  However, there are 7 interments scheduled for the following Thursday, July 12th.  If there are any changes for either date, I will notify you.
Rick Foulon
Assistant State Captain
Patriot Guard Riders of Southern Nevada

Thursday, June 28, 2018

Pecos Road/CC-215 bridge closure scheduled for July 1

Pecos Road/CC-215 bridge closure scheduled for July 1
VASNHS staff and Veterans will begin seeing major traffic changes around the VA Medical Center over the next year as the next phase of improvements begins on the Clark County 215 Beltway between North 5th Street and Lamb Boulevard.

The first impact will be felt on July 1 as the current bridge in front of the VA Medical Center at 215 and Pecos Road closes for approximately four months for demolition and construction of a new bridge.

Individuals travelling to VA Medical Center eastbound on the 215 from the Northwest will be able to exit at Pecos Road, but will need to use S. Lamb Blvd. or Losee Rd. to travel westbound on the 215 from the facility.

Individuals traveling to the facility westbound on the 215 from I-15 will not be able to exit at Pecos. They will need to exit at S. Lamb Blvd. or Losee Road. Pecos Road will be open to eastbound traffic toward I-15 on the 215 from the facility during this phase of construction.

Those travelling to the VA Medical Center on I-15 North from Las Vegas are advised to exit at Lamb Blvd and take E. Centennial Pkwy to Pecos Road.

Engineering, Public Affairs and leadership will all work to keep staff and Veterans updated as construction progresses.




Suicide Prevention is Everyone’s Business. #BeThere.








Saturday, June 23, 2018

US moves 100 coffins to inter-Korean border for war remains

 




©  The Associated Press FILE - In this Nov. 6, 1998, file photo, North Korean soldiers carry an aluminum casket containing remains of a U.S. serviceman killed during the Korean War toward U.N. Command soldiers, foreground, at the border village of Panmunjom, South Korea. South Korean media reported that the U.S. military plans to send 215 caskets to North Korea through a border village on Saturday, June 23, 2018, so that the North could begin the process of returning the remains of U.S. soldiers who have been missing since the 1950-53 Korean War. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon, File)
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — The U.S. military said it moved 100 wooden coffins to the inter-Korean border on Saturday to prepare for North Korea's returning of the remains of American soldiers who have been missing since the 1950-53 Korean War.
U.S. Forces Korea spokesman Col. Chad Carroll also said 158 metal transfer cases were sent to a U.S. air base near Seoul, South Korea's capital, and would be used to send the remains home.
North Korea agreed to return U.S. war remains during the June 12 summit between North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and President Donald Trump.
While the U.S. military preparations suggest that the repatriation of war remains could be imminent, it remains unclear when and how it would occur.

Earlier Saturday, Carroll denied a report by South Korea's Yonhap news agency that U.S. military vehicles carrying more than 200 caskets were planning to cross into North Korea on Saturday. He said plans for the repatriation were "still preliminary."